Makeup

2017's 5 Hottest Beauty Trends

The latest beauty trends to ring in the new year!

Woman with flower wreath and glittery lips
Credits: "Beto Sylvestre at Unsplash.com"
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Just like that, 2017 is here! It’s a new year, which means a new you. Now that we’re well into the new year, let’s discuss the latest trends that everyone’s talking about.

1. Microblading

Microblading Before and After

Photo Credit: alabamaveincenter.com

What is it? We all know that eyebrows are one of the most important facial features. For those who aren’t blessed with dark, full Cindy Crawford eyebrows, this new procedure will save you from that tedious step in the morning that you spend filling in your brows. Microblading is technically tattooing your brows onto your face; however, natural brush strokes are used to make it look as if it’s your natural brow hair. This procedure is only semi-permanent, so you will definitely need to schedule touch-ups based on your skincare routine.

What does it cost? Salons across the U.S. are now providing microblading services. The price typically ranges from $200-$600 depending on the salon.

My advice: Get a consultation. Do your research and find a salon and technician who specializes in this technique. Remember, this is a semi-permanent procedure, so you’ll want to find the best technician you can for your budget.

Dermatologist Thoughts: Microblading involves the use of pigments that are plant-based and can cause allergies in some people. Be sure to let your microblading technician know about any plant allergies you may have. Also worth noting is if you have very oily skin, you may find it more difficult to get the microblading pigment to set and stay in your skin.

2. Black Bottom Liner

Black Bottom Eye Liner on Woman

Photo Credit: makeup.lovetoknow.com

What is it? Having only a winged liner is now a thing of the past. Women are back to using black liner on their bottom lashes to give themselves a bolder look. As they say, fashion recycles itself, and as of 2017, bottom liner is back in black.

What does it cost? You can purchase black liner pencils at any drugstore or beauty store. The price is typically between $3-$25 depending on the brand.

My advice: Definitely use a pencil liner that is waterproof. Since you are lining your water line, your eyes may get teary throughout the day, resulting in raccoon eyes. My favorite waterproof liners are Smashbox’s Always Sharp Waterproof Kohl Liner (retail: $21), Stila’s Smudge Stick Waterproof Eye Liner (retail: $22), and MAC Cosmetics’ Pro Long-wear Eye Liner (retail: $21).

Dermatologist thoughts: While a black liner can really highlight the color of your eyes, if you’re using a bottom liner regularly, use gentle methods to remove the liner. Be especially careful if you are prone to developing eye inflammation or have an eye affliction like blepharitis.  

3. Gray Balayage

Gray Balayage Hair

Photo Credit: @jimmyhilton

What is it? First off, balayage means to sweep or to paint in French. The purpose of balayage is to make a hair dye job look more natural. Nowadays, women are going bold with the look and using an array of fun colors, including the most popular balayage color of 2017: gray. Gray gives your hair a romantic and soft appearance. You can also add a pop of color for a more edgy look.

What does it cost? This look can range from $150-$300 based on the length of your hair, color process, and if you want it to be permanent or semi-permanent (would wash out eventually).

My advice: Do some research and find a good colorist near you, then select the gray tones that will suit your hair and complexion. This look is timeless and natural. You also won’t have to worry about constant maintenance like you would if you dyed your hair starting from the root.

Dermatologist thoughts: Unlike dying hair at the roots, balayage can minimize how much chemical you get on your scalp. On the other hand, balayage can be harsh on your hair, especially if you have naturally dry or sensitive hair.

4. Charcoal Masks

Origins Charcoal Mask

Photo Credit: sephora.com

What is it? Charcoal masks magnetically draw out impurities from your pores. These impurities include the environmental toxins, dirt, and oils that clog your pores. Once the mask is removed, your skin is left clean and refreshed.

What does it cost? There are a variety of masks available with prices typically ranging from $5-$30. 

My advice: Since this mask is meant to remove toxins, I would recommend using it once a week or 3 times a month. The reason is that it’s meant to strip your skin of not only the bad stuff but the good oils as well. After using a charcoal mask, it’s important to replenish your skin with much-needed moisture. My current favorite is the Origins Charcoal Mask. It’s great for all skin types and does not contain any harsh chemicals.

Dermatologist thoughts: Charcoal is absorptive and can draw the water out of your skin. If you have naturally dry skin or sensitive skin, make sure that you use a good moisturizer to replenish the skin’s water.

5. Glitter

Glitter Lips

Photo Credit: makeupforlife.net

What is it? Glitter is back! The 90’s trends are also being recycled in 2017. Nowadays, you’ll find models wearing glitter liner and make-up artists replicating the looks.

What does it cost? Glitter can be quite inexpensive. You can pick some up at your local craft store. Just make sure it is safe to use on your eyes. Prices can vary between $2-$15.

My advice: Glitter can definitely amp up your look on a night out on the town. Throw some on your lid or inner tear duct. Maybe even some finely milled glitter to highlight the high points of your face. My favorite affordable glitter is NYX Face and Body Glitter. Prior to applying any glitter on your face and body, I’d suggest using a glitter primer such as NYX Glitter Primer. This will help keep the glitter in place. 

Dermatologist thoughts: Glitter is pretty safe. In rare cases, people can have an allergy to one of the chemicals used to coat glitter. For this reason, it’s recommended that you use FDA approved glitter and avoid craft glitter.

 

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